Newer Honda Odyssey 2nd row seats - quite the challenge.

  • For registered users, a Google custom search option has been added that will search across several dedicated GMC Motorhome sites including this forum, GMCMI.com, and bdub.net. To use it, either click the "G" icon at the bottom of the search dialog or select the "Google search" tab in the search results. This new feature is also useful when your search includes words that are shorter than the 4 letter minimum supported by the forum's built-in search engine.

Seeburg220

Active member
Oct 25, 2021
217
80
28
Berryville, VA
I bought a pair of 2019 Honda Odyssey 2nd row seats to replace the captain's seats up front. I need to remove the locking mechanisms and they are attached with six large rivets per each seat. Take a look at the pics - what would be your choice for removing them? I have a drill, a Sawsall, a 4 1/2" grinder, and a Dremel. Is an air chisel an option, or will that mangle the metal too much? 20230422_124524.jpg20230422_124518.jpg
 
Last edited:
When I did this I ground off the heads with an angle grinder with a cutting wheel. The parts were discarded so I didn't bother with "pretty."
 
  • Like
Reactions: Seeburg220
When I did this I ground off the heads with an angle grinder with a cutting wheel. The parts were discarded so I didn't bother with "pretty."
Was the track the same? It doesn't look like you could get a cutting wheel in there without cutting the track. Maybe center punch, then drill out the head would be better.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Seeburg220
Was the track the same? It doesn't look like you could get a cutting wheel in there without cutting the track. Maybe center punch, then drill out the head would be better.
The tracks look different than the 2009 ones. I can't get a grinder wheel in there unless I cut away some of the track. I'm guessing a drill is easiest for access, but will probably take forever lol.
 
I ended up using a sawsall for the front and rear rivets, as they were fairly easy to get to. A third rivet, which is hidden in front of the rear rivet, was defeated using my angle grinder with a cutoff wheel. 20230422_151040.jpg

20230422_160600.jpg

20230422_160721.jpg

20230422_160632.jpg
 
Paul,
It's not clear to me if you're going to use the lower part held on with the rivets. I did not use the lower part that I cut the rivets from so access was simply to grind away stuff in my way. If you are going to use both parts why are you removing the rivets? If you're using both parts find a concrete block to grind away at and reduce the diameter of your cut-off wheel. It will tuck in a little easier.
 
Paul,
It's not clear to me if you're going to use the lower part held on with the rivets. I did not use the lower part that I cut the rivets from so access was simply to grind away stuff in my way. If you are going to use both parts why are you removing the rivets? If you're using both parts find a concrete block to grind away at and reduce the diameter of your cut-off wheel. It will tuck in a little easier.
Doug - I'm not sure if you meant me, Mark and not Paul. If that's the case, I needed to remove the latching mechanisms that hold the seat into the vehicle. That piece will not be needed, so I hacked away at it, to get it off of the seat tracks, which I will use. I've since run into another problem with bolt clearances inside the sliding tracks. I've ordered some grade 8 shoulder bolts, that have a low profile, and hope they will fit inside the two pieces of slider track.
 
Both seats finally installed! If anybody asks, Honda Odyssey seats from 2019 (these) are markedly different than Odyssey seats circa 2010. These sit lower on their frames and the holes are not accessible to put bolts through, due to the design of the slider on the seat track. I believe the older seats had larger, more open sliders. I ended up welding Super Strut bars across the seat sliders and adding spacers to get the seat height just right. A lot of trial and error, but I think they will work out well for me.

20230427_141449.jpg

20230427_141628.jpg

20230428_153554 (1).jpg
 
Last edited:
Greg,
The PDF doc of your airflow journey is pretty impressive; beyond my abilities until I read your PDF. Nicely done. My solution for a skanky dash was to buy a nice grey cover and forget it. I admire your resourcefulness and willingness to tackle that job. Three controls, Fan, Temp, Mode--I shudder to think about all your hours of R&D and parts searching divided by three. No one but you will really understand the true cost when they reach to correct "I'm a little chilly". Thanks for sharing.